Minnesota Hunters Can Apply For Elk Tag

Hunters Can Apply For Elk Tag

Minnesota has more elk hunting tags available this year and has begun to take applications.

Elk hunting will take place from late August to early December in Kittson County in northwestern Minnesota, where the state’s two herds live.

This year’s seasons are structured to allow hunters to have more opportunities to harvest antlerless elk.

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is offering 44 elk licenses this year. Last year there were 27 offered.

The application deadline is June 12.

The DNR is allowing hunters to choose from three options when they apply to harvest elk: a license for a bull elk; a permit for an antlerless elk, which can be a female or a young male; or a license for either a bull or antlerless elk.

The 44 elk hunting licenses offered this year are in either the Kittson central zone (zone 20), with 42 licenses, or Kittson northeast zone (zone 30), with two licenses. Hunts in these zones focus on the Kittson Central herd, which is increasing.

The dates for the 2020 Minnesota elk season are:

• Saturday, Aug. 22, to Sunday, Aug. 30: Four antlerless tags and three either-sex tags will be available in the Kittson Central (zone 20) zone.

• Saturday, Sept. 5, to Sunday, Sept. 13: Four antlerless tags and three either-sex tags will be available in the Kittson Central (zone 20) zone, and two bull-only tags will be available in the Kittson northeast (zone 30) zone.

• Saturday, Sept. 19, to Sunday, Sept. 27: Four antlerless tags and three either-sex tags will be available in the Kittson Central (zone 20).

• Saturday, Oct. 3, to Sunday, Oct. 11: Four antlerless tags and three either-sex tags will be available in the Kittson Central (zone 20).

• Saturday, Oct. 24, to Sunday, Nov. 1: Four antlerless tags and three either-sex tags will be available in the Kittson Central (zone 20).

• Saturday, Dec. 5, to Sunday, Dec. 13: Four antlerless tags and three either-sex tags will be available in the Kittson Central (zone 20).

The DNR uses hunting as the main tool to manage elk populations, with the harvest of female elk the focus of keeping populations within goal range.

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To apply for a license, click here.

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